Vindar från Viborg

Number: 
6
Artist: 
Tuulikki Bartosik and Emma Reid

We have been playing together since 2000. We discovered the music of Orsa independently: Emma first through summer courses in fiddle playing in Malung, and then further with her teacher, Ellika Frisell, at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. Tuulikki heard her first Orsa melody on an archive recording, and was soon to fall in love with Gössa Anders' (1878-1963) playing. Since then she has tried to recreate his ancient and special dialect style on the accordion with the help of her teacher, Sven Ahlbäck, at the Royal College of Music.

When we discovered our common interest, a long-term project was born. We noticed that there are significant differences between how the Orsa tunes are played today and how Gössa Anders played, and became curious to go back to Gössa's mysterious playing style. What is it that makes Gössa Anders' fiddling so special? Quartertones, complicated rhythms, a modal tonal language, steady swing, directed expression, advanced playing technique, continuous drive, particular ornaments… the list goes on. Even our own arrangements are based on the traditional harmony playing; we have, for example, learnt harmonies by Gössa Anna (1906-1999) and Jämt Olle (1872-1938). The goal is to become so anchored in the style that we can improvise both melodies and harmonies within the tradition.

For Tuulikki, the project has involved a completely new musical way of thinking for her instrument. One challenge has been how best to imitate quartertones on the accordion - a chromatic instrument.

We love playing for dances, where spontaneity and the wonderful Gössa-swing are given the greatest room for expression. Apart from Orsa tunes, we play tunes from Västerdalarna, Älvdalen and also our own music.

Publishing year: 
2003
Recording year: 
2003

1.–3. Recorded and mixed by Erik Metall in the Semistudio at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm, 4. recorded and mixed by Magnus Lindström in the Big studio at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm.

1. Vals efter fadern

Comp. trad., arr. Tuulikki Bartosik, Emma Reid.

Gössa Anders learned this waltz from his father Gössa Anders Senior. We have listened to archive recordings and made our own arrangement of the tune. The accordion is slightly "out of tune" so that you get a historic feel to the Orsa sound and the quartertones.

Tuulikki Bartosik: accordion
Emma Reid: violin

2. Polska efter Bleckå

Comp. trad.

This tune is also named "Mora-Frisken" or "Systerpolska no. 3" because the melodic phrases are similar to those in Systerpolska no. 1. It has been said that Bleckå did not like to share his tunes and it was seldom that he played together with other folk musicians. If he noticed that someone was listening especially carefully when he was playing he started to vary the melody. That is one explanation for the myriads of variants of Bleckå tunes.

Tuulikki Bartosik: accordion
Emma Reid: violin

3. Orsa brudmarsch efter Bleckå

Comp. trad.

This tune became our favorite during recording. The quartertones on the accordion sound very close to the original violin sound. Emma plays a harmony after Gössa Anna Andersson.

Those three tunes were recorded and mixed by Erik Metall in the Semistudio at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm.

Tuulikki Bartosik: haitari
Emma Reid: violin

4. Två polskor efter Bleckå

Comp. trad.

Systerpolska no 1. and no.2. Compared to other typical Orsa tunes these two polskas are unusually cheerful and have no quartertones.

Recorded and mixed by Magnus Lindström in the Big studio at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm.

Tuulikki Bartosik: accordion
Emma Reid: violin